Ed Blaskey Named Chairman of 2014 Long Island Heart Walk

Ed Blaskey, TD Bank’s Market President for Suburban NY and Long Island has been named Chairman of the American Heart Association’s 2014 Long Island Heart Walk.  This year’s walk will be taking place on Sunday, September 21 at Jones Beach in Wantagh.  

In this capacity, Mr. Blaskey is responsible for commercial lending activities and commercial deposit growth on Long Island, Westchester and the Lower Hudson Valley.

He has 33 years of banking experience and joined TD Bank in 2001 as Regional Vice President to help launch the Long Island Market for the Bank.  He was instrumental in expanding TD Bank Long Island’s retail franchise and commercial lending business lines.  Mr. Blaskey contributed to establishing the brand, model and culture of what has become America’s Most Convenient Bank.

“I am honored to serve as the 2014 Long Island Heart Walk Chairman” said Blaskey.  “I look forward to working with Executive Leaders across Long Island to help raise awareness and funds for the American Heart Association to continue its mission to build healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke”.

The Long Island Heart Walk supports a ground-breaking national American Heart Association movement to get America walking to live longer, heart-healthy lives.

For more information about the Long Island Heart Walk taking place on Sunday, September 21 call the American Heart Association at 516-450-9104 or visit us at http://www.longislandheartwalk.org.

Local sponsors include TD Bank, Astoria Bank, Vita Coco, Cohn Reznick, EVO Payments Intl., Winthrop University Hospital, Luxottica and Catholic Health Services. Local media sponsors are News 12 Long Island, WBAB 102.3-FM and WBLI 106.1-FM.

Ed Blaskey lives in Merrick with his wife Lisa. He has three children: Christopher, Mathew and Kimberly.

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Put Your Heart First – Join the American Heart Association’s Long Island Heart Walk to Save Lives

Heart Walk participants take healthy steps to stomp out heart disease and stroke

 More than four thousand Long Islanders are expected to join the American Heart Association’s Long Island Heart Walk on Sunday, September 21 to raise funds to fight heart disease and stroke, America’s No. 1 and No. 4 killers,. The annual event begins at 8:30 a.m. at Jones Beach, Field 5 in Wantagh, NY.

The non-competitive, three-mile walk includes teams of employees from local companies, along with friends and family members of all ages.

“For every hour of brisk walking, life expectancy may increase for some adults by two hours,” said Ed Blaskey, TD Bank’s Market President for Suburban NY and Long Island and Chairman of the 2014 Long Island Heart Walk.  “I look forward to working with Executive Leaders across Long Island to help raise awareness and funds for the American Heart Association to continue its mission to build healthier lives, free of cardiovascular diseases and stroke.”

Heart Walk participants will experience three “communities” that feature relevant resources and activities.

This year’s Long Island Heart Walk will once again feature interactive and compelling life-changing information and activities including a Kidz Zone-featuring face painting, caricatures, magician, craft, and games for kids and families, Eat Street-featuring heart healthy snacks before and after you walk, Team Photos-Grab everyone you’re walking with for a group picture! Mended Hearts, Red Caps & White Caps-All Heart Disease Survivors Receive a Red Cap! Stroke Survivors receive a White Cap!

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This year we are honored to have Brian McKee, Hicksville resident and survivor serve as our 2014 Red Cap Ambassador.  Jack Michael Foley, Franklin Square resident, born with a congenital heart defect is proud to serve as the 2014 Long Island Heart Walk Red Cape Ambassador, hoping to raise awareness for congenital heart defects and provide hope for other families.    

Research has shownwalking is the single most effective form of exercise to achieve heart health.The benefits of walking and moderate physical activity for as little as 30 minutes each day can help reduce the risk of heart disease.

The annual success of the Long Island Heart Walk is due in part to our national sponsor, Subway. Local sponsors include TD Bank, Astoria Bank, Vita Coco, Cohn Reznick, EVO Payments Intl., Winthrop University Hospital, Luxottica and Catholic Health Services. Local media sponsors are News 12 Long Island, WBAB 102.3-FM and WBLI 106.1-FM.

For more information about the Long Island Heart Walk taking place on Sunday, September 21st call the American Heart Association at 516-450-9104 or visit us at http://www.longislandheartwalk.org.

 

New awareness campaign encourages people pledge to reduce sodium

American Heart Association survey shows Americans are unaware of how much sodium they eat

Americans eat too much salt, and most have no idea how much they are eating, according to new consumer research by the American Heart Association.

Nearly all of the 1,000 people surveyed by the American Heart Association (97 percent) either underestimated or could not estimate how much sodium they eat every day. Too much sodium in the diet can increase risk for high blood pressure, stroke, heart disease and other major health problems.

Most people who underestimated their sodium consumption in the survey were off by around 1,000 milligrams. That’s a significant amount, considering the American Heart Association recommends 1,500 milligrams a day for ideal heart health. Most Americans consume more than double that.

In an effort to help people better understand and limit their sodium intake, the American Heart Association has launched a new awareness campaign called “I Love You Salt, But You’re Breaking My Heart.” The campaign includes a new website, heart.org/sodium, with an online pledge for people to commit to reduce how much sodium they eat, along with a new video, “Don’t Let Salt Sneak Up on You” (http://bit.ly/1trMjLv), to show how sodium is sneaking into our foods. The site also features a blog, sodium quiz and infographics, links to lower-sodium recipes, and educational articles.

Limiting salt in the bigger picture—the U.S. food supply—is an important goal of the campaign. That’s because 75 percent of Americans’ sodium consumption is from processed, prepackaged, and restaurant foods—not the salt shaker.

“It’s challenging for Americans to stick to sodium intake recommendations because most of the sodium we eat in this country is added to our food before we buy it,” said Dr. Jean Cacciabaudo, member of the American Heart Association’s Long Island Board of Directors and Chief of Cardiology at Southside Hospital. . “In order to really make a difference in the health of all Americans, we must reduce sodium in the food supply through the support of food manufacturers, food processors and the restaurant industry.”

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Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and disability worldwide, and high blood pressure is a major risk factor. One-third of American adults have high blood pressure, and about 90 percent of American adults are expected to develop high blood pressure over their lifetimes. Children, too, are at risk of developing heart disease and elevated blood pressure at an earlier age. Nearly 80 percent of 1- to 3-year-olds and more than 90 percent of 4- to 18-year-olds eat too much sodium.

“America’s health could take a turn for the better if more Americans focused on their sodium intake,” Dr. Cacciabaudo said. “The American Heart Association encourages people to reduce their sodium intake by comparing product labels and selecting the option with less sodium, limiting the consumption of processed, prepackaged, and restaurant foods, and by substituting salt with herbs, spices, citrus juice, or vinegars to season food.”

Reducing current sodium intake by 1,200 milligrams a day has been estimated to prevent between 44,000 and 92,000 deaths per year and save between $10 billion and $24 billion annually in healthcare costs.

To learn more about sodium and to take the pledge to reduce how much you eat, visit heart.org/sodium.

Are you a Heart or Stroke Survivor?

Have you or someone you know suffered from heart disease or stroke?

The Long Island American Heart Association is looking for survivors to form Heart Walk teams and join us at the American Heart Association’s Long Island Heart Walk on Sunday, September 21, 2014 at Jones Beach.

The Heart Walk takes a critical step toward raising vital funds for research, education, and awareness of heart disease and stroke. Last year over 4,000 walkers and volunteers participated in the Heart Walk on Long Island and this year we would like you to join us.

Form a team and walk to celebrate your survival, dedicate your walk to a survivor you know, or dedicate your walk to a loved one’s memory.

We also offer opportunity’s to volunteer and get involved in our survivors network.

For information on how to form a team or get involved as a volunteer contact Ann Morrison at 516-450-9104 or visit http://www.longislandheartwalk.org

AHA funds new research network aimed at preventing heart disease, stroke

The American Heart Association is funding a new research network to help people make behavior changes to prevent heart disease and stroke, the two leading causes of death in the world.

Four institutions are banding together as the Strategically Focused Prevention Research Network Centers, funded by a $15 million grant from the American Heart Association, which is designed to help people live longer, healthier lives.

Obesity, high blood pressure and heart failure are among the study areas at the collaborative network, which is made up of investigators from Northwestern University in Chicago, Vanderbilt University in Nashville, the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York and the University of Texas-Southwestern Medical School in Dallas. The work will begin July 1.

“Heart attack and stroke can strike suddenly, and frequently without warning. The best way to reduce premature death from cardiovascular diseases and stroke is to prevent the development of the risk factors that lead to these conditions,” said American Heart Association President Elliott Antman, M.D., professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and a senior physician in the Cardiovascular Division of the Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. “Scientists working in these research centers are seeking to discover mechanisms that will allow all Americans to live healthier lives, and help lead us to a culture of health.”

A culture of health is an environment where the default choices people make are the healthy ones. For example, the air is smoke-free, nutritious foods are easy to find, safe places to exercise are abundant and quality healthcare is accessible.

The culture of health concept is also important to the association’s goal to improve the cardiovascular health of all Americans by 20 percent while reducing deaths from cardiovascular diseases and stroke by 20 percent by 2020.

Getting America healthier means making headway in important areas like smoking, physical activity, diet, blood pressure, cholesterol and blood sugar. Northwestern University will take a closer look at why heart-health measures decline from childhood to middle age and see if the latest techniques can help maintain ideal heart health and reverse declines. The goal is to learn how to implement behavior change programs on a large scale to benefit the most people.

Two major hurdles – an overly salty, heart-hurting diet and the frequent need to take multiple, expensive medications – is spurring Vanderbilt University to develop new approaches for preventing high blood pressure. The goals are to understand how salt causes tissue injury, develop a method to detect and lower excess salt, and determine if a simple treatment in one pill can improve cardiovascular health.

Nearly one-third of adults and children in the United States are obese, with rates even higher in Hispanic and African-American communities. The Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai will aim to build a culture of health in Harlem, New York, with an urban-based health program. Obesity is closely linked to heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer, among the leading causes of preventable death.

Heart failure, when the heart can’t pump enough blood to the organs, is one of the most common reasons people 65 and older go into the hospital. Since there are no proven therapies to prevent heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, which affects about half of these patients, the University of Texas-Southwestern Medical School wants to shift the focus to prevention. The center expects to find new interventions that can help heart failure patients in clinical settings.

Each network center will receive about $3.8 million over the next four years.

 

American Heart Association and Volunteers Are Overjoyed At CPR in Schools Passage

Across New York, volunteers with the American Heart Association are applauding the state Assembly’s passage yesterday of the CPR in Schools bill.  The bill passed the Senate last week, and now goes to Gov. Andrew Cuomo for his signature.

“This is a real act of leadership,” said Dan Moran, president of Next-Act in Colonie and chair of the American Heart Association’s New York State Advocacy Committee. “It is a fitting tribute to Assemblyman Harvey Weisenberg, who sponsored the bill, and is a longtime supporter of CPR in Schools. We all join his colleagues in the Assembly in giving him a standing ovation as he heads into retirement. We were thrilled last week when the Senate passed the bill, and thank Senator Mark Grisanti of Buffalo for sponsoring the bill there. We also applaud Assemblywoman Cathy Nolan and Senator John Flanagan for their work that will help save lives.”

Melinda Murray of Queens was speechless, and tears were in her eyes when she talked about the bill passage. Murray’s son Dominic died of sudden cardiac arrest when he was 17 years old. “After eight years of pushing for this bill, I cannot believe it,” Murray said. “This has breathed life into Dominic and all the young lives silenced by sudden cardiac arrest. I’m so overjoyed.”

This past Sunday, June 16, was the fifth anniversary of Emily Rose Adamczak’s death from sudden cardiac arrest. Emily was 14. Emily’s mother, Annette Adamczak of Akron, has lobbied nonstop for the passage of the CPR in Schools bill, and trains high school students in Hands-Only CPR.

Adamczak paused to catch her breath at hearing the news.

“We can dedicate this to all the kids, all the ones we lost, not just Em, and all the ones we hope to train,” she said. “This is nothing that can stop us now.”

“It is a great day for New York. Our children and our families are now safer and many lives, young and old, will be saved,” said Steve Tannenbaum of Merrick, whose life was saved by CPR five years ago when he was 56 years old and playing softball.

The CPR in Schools bill now goes to Gov. Andrew Cuomo for his signature. From there, the Commissioner of the State Education Department has 180 days to recommend to the Board of Regents that CPR in Schools become part of the curriculum.

Merrick Resident & AHA encourages NYto be the next state to pass the CPR in Schools legislation

Reason No. 17: A college graduation, a swearing-in ceremony, and a walk down the aisle

American Heart Association encourages New York to be the next state to pass the CPR in Schools legislation

Since suffering a sudden cardiac arrestfive years ago, Steve Tannenbaum of Merrick serves on four boards that promote CPR and AED use, and has spoken nationally about the importance of both. Tannenbaum is Reason No. 17 to pass the CPR in Schools bill.

“I was 56, playing softball at Oceanside High School, and I collapsed with sudden cardiac arrest,” Tannebaum said. “Two mothers who were picking up their children immediately started CPR. When the Nassau County Police arrived, they shocked me three times with an AED. Within two weeks, I celebrated Mother’s Day with my wife and family; attended my son’s graduation from college and my daughter’s swearing-in ceremony as a lawyer. Last December, I walked my younger daughter down the aisle as she was married. None of these miracles could have occurred if my 2 ‘angels’ hadn’t performed CPR upon me. I’m eternally grateful to them. The CPR in Schools bill will help create many more miracles and memories.”

An updated version of the CPR in Schools legislation (A9298/S7096) was introduced by Assemblyman Harvey Weisenberg, D-Long Beach, and Senator Mark Grisanti, R-Buffalo. The Senate passed the bill on Thursday, June 12, and it is currently in the Assembly Rules committee.

Yesterday, lawmakers and media will receive a one-page document with Tannenbaum’s picture and a brief reason why the CPR in Schools bill should be passed. Since May 5, on each legislative session day, the American Heart Association American Heart Association has shared will share a real story of a New Yorker impacted by sudden cardiac arrest. Some lost their lives to sudden cardiac arrest, some were saved by sudden cardiac arrest, and some saved someone with CPR and/or an AED.

On June 3, nearly 100 volunteers – among them those depicted in the “reasons” – attended a CPR Rally in the Capitol to show how easy it is to learn the American Heart Association’s Hands-Only CPR.

“CPR is a lifesaving solution,” said Weisenberg. “As a former police officer, school administrator and lifeguard, I know firsthand that we need bystander CPR to save lives. Many people are alive today because individuals trained in CPR — including youth and adults who received that training in school — gave someone CPR until EMTs arrived. I’m committed to passing the CPR in Schools bill so that we can create a generation in which New Yorkers are prepared to save lives.”

“Schools prepare students with essential life skills, and CPR skills are among the most critical lifesaving skills that make our communities safer, year after year, said Grisanti. “It’s time to add New York to the growing list of states that have passed this legislation. I’m honored to sponsor the CPR schools legislation in the New York State Senate and I am proud to work in partnership with the American Heart Association and families in western New York to help make this bill become a law.”Image

“With the Senate passage of the CPR in Schools bill last week, New York moved closer to joining the 17 other states that already have CPR in Schools bills,” said Dan Moran, president of Next-Act in Albany and chair of the American Heart Association’s New York State Advocacy Committee. “We are very optimistic that by the end of this week, the bill will have passed the Assembly and be on its way to Gov. Cuomo’s desk for his signature. Nearly 424,000 people suffer sudden cardiac arrest each year, and only 10.4 % survive. Having CPR performed doubles or triples the chances of survival. It would be a shame for the legislature to adjourn without passing this bill.”